What To See

 

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

New York City, Downtown

Trinity Church 

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

75 Broadway, New York, NY 10006

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“But did Hamilton believe sincerely in religion, or was it just politically convenient? Like Washington, he never talked about Christ and took refuge in vague references to “providence” or “heaven.” He did not seem to attend services with Eliza, who increasingly spoke the language of evangelical Christianity, and did not belong formally to a denomination, even though Eliza rented a pew at Trinity Church. ”

In Real Life:

Trinity Church played a role in the life of Alexander Hamilton.  Eliza Hamilton rented a pew in the church. Hamilton called the Reverend Benjamin Moore, who was the rector of Trinity Church to his death bed – but he refused to give Hamilton holy communion.  Hamilton was also buried at Trinity – along with Eliza and Angelica Church his sister in law.

In Alexander Hamilton,

========================

St. Paul’s Chapel 

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

209 Broadway, New York, NY 10007

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“he moment was joyous but not flawless. When Washington read a brief inaugural address, probably drafted by James Madison, to Congress in the Senate chamber, he kept his left hand in one pocket and turned pages with the other, making an awkward impression. His nervous mumbling was scarcely audible. One observer said wryly of America’s hero, Washington was more “agitated and embarrassed than ever he was by the leveled cannon or pointed musket.” 28 Afterward, the first president and his entourage marched up Broadway to pray at St. Paul’s Chapel, near where Hamilton had attended King’s College.”  Page i800

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

========================

New York City Hall

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

City Hall Park, New York, NY 10007

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“On July 4, 1792, a full-length portrait of Hamilton, painted by John Trumbull on the commission of New York’s grateful merchants, went up in City Hall. Lest he seem self-aggrandizing, Hamilton consented to the project with one caveat: that the painting “appear unconnected with any incident of my political life.” 88 Trumbull painted Hamilton frequently—two original portraits and fifteen replicas—and captured him here in his prime, with only the slightest shadow of a double chin. The treasury secretary gazes off into the distance with visionary confidence. Very refined, he stands by his desk in a pale suit, his body slim and shapely, one bare hand poised on his desk, the other elegantly gloved and holding a second glove; his black cloak is draped over a nearby chair. In tribute to Hamilton’s literary powers, a pen is dipped in an inkwell. With his face illuminated by a good-natured smile, he radiates a quiet, buoyant energy and seems ready for many more triumphs.”  Page 1,104

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

You can see a painting of Alexander at City Hall

===============================

Finance Museum

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

48 Wall St, New York, NY 10005

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“Many Americans still regarded banking as a black, unfathomable art, and it was anathema to upstate populists. The Bank of New York was denounced by some as the cat’s-paw of British capitalists. Hamilton’s petition to the state legislature for a bank charter was denied for seven years, as Governor George Clinton succumbed to the prejudices of his agricultural constituents who thought the bank would give preferential treatment to merchants and shut out farmers. Clinton distrusted corporations as shady plots against the populace, foreshadowing the Jeffersonian revulsion against Hamilton’s economic programs. The upshot was that in June 1784 the Bank of New York opened as a private bank without a charter. It occupied the Walton mansion on St. George’s Square (now Pearl Street), a three-story building of yellow brick and brown trim, and three years later it relocated to Hanover Square. It was to house the personal bank accounts of both Alexander Hamilton and John Jay and prove one of Hamilton’s most durable monuments, becoming the oldest stock traded on the New York Stock Exchange.”  Page 591

In Real Life:

NYT -On the site of the Bank of New York, which was founded by Hamilton, this museum is devoted to American finance and financial history. On display are documents signed by Hamilton, copies of his published works, and replicas of the dueling pistols that Aaron Burr fatally fired at him. (Hamilton’s pistols are on private display at the JPMorgan Chase building in Manhattan.)

In Alexander Hamilton,

==========================================

Wall Street Inception (Tontine Coffee House)

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

Wall and Water Streets

In Alexander Hamilton:

“A year later, trading in government bonds grew so brisk that the Buttonwood group adjourned to an upstairs room of the new Tontine Coffee House, a three-story brick structure at Wall and Water Street, right near Hamilton’s new home.  Its first president was Archibald Gracie, whose East River mansion was to house New York mayors. Local wits christened the Tontine Coffee House “Scrip Castle” in honor of Hamilton’s bank scrip, which had triggered expanded share trading. Henceforth, Wall Street would signal much more than a short, narrow lane in lower Manhattan. It would symbolize an industry, a sector of the economy, a state of mind, and it became synonymous with American finance itself.”  Page i1101

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

====================================

Hamilton Law Office

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

Exchange Place, New York, NY 10005

In Alexander Hamilton:

“During Hamilton’s final day at his Garden Street (today Exchange Place) law office, his clerk, Judah Hammond, observed nothing untoward in his demeanor: “General Hamilton came to my desk in the tranquil manner usual with him and gave me a business paper with his instructions concerning it. I saw no change in his appearance. These were his last moments in his place of business.” 10 ”  Page 1965

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

NYT: The Hamiltons resided for 10 years at 58 Wall Street. But Hamilton also had law offices at 69 Stone Street, 12 Garden Street (today Exchange Place), 63 Pine Street, and 58 Partition Street (now Fulton Street) — though none of the structures remain. After he and his wife, Eliza, built their family estate in northern Manhattan, Hamilton kept a townhouse at 54 Cedar Street. He spent his last night there.

CUBED:  After serving as George Washington’s right-hand man on the battlefields of the Revolutionary War and then as a representative in the Congress of Confederation, Hamilton returned to the city in 1783. He reinvented himself as a prominent attorney, establishing a law office located at 12 Garden Street downtown. Garden Street is long gone, but it’s now Exchange Place in the center of the Financial District.

===========================

Hanover Square

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

New York, NY 10005

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“The settled portion of the city stretched from the Battery up to the Common. Shaded by poplars and elms, Broadway was the main thoroughfare, flanked by mazes of narrow, winding streets. There were sights galore to enthrall the young West Indian. Fetching ladies promenaded along Broadway, handsome coaches cruised the streets, and graceful church spires etched an incipient skyline. Rich merchants had colonized Wall Street and Hanover Square, and their weekend pleasure gardens extended north along the Hudson shore.”  Page 168

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

========================

Federal Hall 

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

26 Wall St, New York, NY 10005

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“Selected as temporary home of the new federal government, New York had devoted considerable expense to preparations. Hoping to become the permanent capital, the city had invested in some necessary improvements. The Common Council hired Major Pierre Charles L’Enfant, the French architect and engineer who was to later design Washington, D.C., to renovate City Hall at the corner of Broad and Wall. He transformed it into the elegant, neoclassical Federal Hall, surmounted by a glass cupola. Some money for the alterations came from local citizens and some from Hamilton’s Bank of New York. When the new Congress first met there in early April, the flag from the “Federal Ship Hamilton” waved over the building, which had a depiction of an American eagle embedded in its facade.
On April 30, George Washington rose early, sprinkled powder on his hair, and prepared for his great day. At noon, accompanied by a legislative escort, he rode to Federal Hall in a fancy yellow carriage to take the oath of office. Ten thousand ecstatic New Yorkers squeezed into the surrounding streets to observe the historic moment. Hamilton, who had done as much as anyone to bring it about, looked on distantly from the balcony of his Wall Street home.”  Page i798

In Real Life:

NYT -This spot was the first Capitol building of the United States, where George Washington took the oath of office as the nation’s first president, observed by a crowd of 10,000. Hamilton watched the ceremony from the balcony of his home at 58 (now 57) Wall Street, several yards away. The original hall was destroyed in 1812; the current structure was built in 1842.

In Alexander Hamilton,

=================================

Hamilton Family Home

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

57 Wall St, New York, NY 10005

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“For ten years, the Hamiltons had a home at 57 (then 58) Wall Street. A sketch of this bygone Wall Street shows a prosperous thoroughfare lined with three-story brick buildings. Well-dressed people saunter down brick sidewalks and roll in carriages over cobblestones at a time when many lanes were still unpaved. The young couple lived comfortably enough and entertained often, although Hamilton’s business records reveal numerous small loans from friends to tide them over. One of his first purchases after leaving the army bespoke the convivial host: he bought decanters, two ale glasses, and a dozen wineglasses.”  Page

In Real Life:

NYT: The Hamiltons resided for 10 years at 58 Wall Street. But Hamilton also had law offices at 69 Stone Street, 12 Garden Street (today Exchange Place), 63 Pine Street, and 58 Partition Street (now Fulton Street) — though none of the structures remain. After he and his wife, Eliza, built their family estate in northern Manhattan, Hamilton kept a townhouse at 54 Cedar Street. He spent his last night there.

In Alexander Hamilton,

===========================

Fraunces Tavern

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

54 Pearl St, New York, NY 10004

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“On December 4, Washington made his tearful farewell to his officers at Fraunces Tavern at the corner of Broad and Pearl Streets, again underscoring that military officers were merely servants of the republic. Washington resisted all calls to become a king. There is no proof that Hamilton attended the historic valedictory, in spite of his having been at Washington’s side for four years of war. ”  Page i544

In Real Life:

NYT – One of the oldest structures in Manhattan, this museum and restaurant was a thriving tavern during the Revolutionary War — and served as a headquarters for the Continental Army. On July 4, 1804, Hamilton and Burr both attended an event here for the Society of the Cincinnati. It was the last time they met before their fateful duel.

In Alexander Hamilton,

===============================

The Battery

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

New York, NY 10004

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“The New York Provincial Congress worried that the two dozen cannon posted at Fort George at the tip of the Battery might be seized by the British. Hamilton, joined by fifteen other King’s College volunteers, signed up for a hazardous operation to drag the heavy artillery to safety under the liberty pole on the Common. (College lore later claimed that two of the salvaged cannon were buried under the campus green.) Lashing the cannon with ropes, Hamilton and his fellow students rescued more than ten big guns before a barge from the Asia, moored near the shore, began to strafe them with fire. The patriots, possibly including Hamilton, returned fire as the barge darted back to the Asia.”

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

GreenwichVillage

Bayard Mansion

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

83 Jane Street, New York, NY  10014

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“Notified by his servant that Hamilton and Pendleton had pushed off toward New Jersey at dawn, apparently from his own dock, the waiting William Bayard later said that “too well he conjectured the fatal errand and foreboded the dreadful result.” 45 Bayard, a rich merchant and Bank of New York director, watched the incoming boat with trepidation and burst into tears when he saw Hamilton lying at the bottom. Servants brought a cot down to the water and gently transported Hamilton across Bayard’s garden to his mansion, which stood at what is now 80–82 Jane Street. Taken to a large, second-floor bedroom, Alexander Hamilton was never to emerge from the house.”  Page i15

In Real Life:

NYT:  Hamilton spent his final hours at the home of his friend William Bayard, director of the Bank of New York. He received visits from friends and relatives before dying on July 12. Despite the commemorative plaque, the house may actually have been slightly north.

CUBED: Partially paralyzed but still alive, a dying Hamilton was brought back across the Hudson to the house of his friend William Bayard, a banker residing in what is now the West Village. Hamilton perished from his injuries a day after the duel on July 12, 1804. A plaque at 82 Jane Street, posted in 1936, marks the site of Bayard’s house where Hamilton passed his final hours. But here’s the weird thing: The plaque is in the wrong place. The edifice really would have stood a block north on Horatio Street. So much for historical accuracy.

In Alexander Hamilton,

==============================================

New York Evening Post

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

1211 Avenue of the Americas, New York City, 10036

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“The repeal and other Jeffersonian innovations had spurred Hamilton and his friends to found a new Federalist paper, the New-York Evening Post, now the oldest continuously active paper in America. Robert Troup complained at the time, “We have not a paper in the city on the federal side that is worth reading.” 36 Newspaper editor Noah Webster had turned against Hamilton after the Adams pamphlet, depriving him of an outlet for his views. Marginalized but far from eliminated as a force in national affairs, Hamilton hoped the Post would chart a path for other Federalist newspapers and breathe life into a nearly moribund party. Of the ten thousand dollars of start-up capital, Hamilton likely contributed one thousand. Tradition has it that the decision to launch the Post was made in the mansion of merchant Archibald Gracie.”  Page 1835

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

================================

Hamilton Hall, Columbia University

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

83 Jane Street, New York, NY  10014

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“Another leitmotif of Hamilton’s private life was his constant support of educational and scholarly pursuits. On January 21, 1791, he was admitted to the American Philosophical Society, the country’s oldest learned organization. Academic honors tumbled in on this man who had never officially finished college. Already a trustee of Columbia College, he now harvested a succession of honorary doctorates from Columbia, Dartmouth, Princeton, Harvard, and Brown, all before the tender age of forty.”  Page i967

In Real Life:

Following a rough childhood—he was born out of wedlock in the Caribbean and later orphaned—a young Hamilton arrived in the colonies in 1772. He came to New York to study at King’s College, an institution that would later be known as Columbia University. It was here that Hamilton became involved in the burgeoning revolutionary cause and made his first public speeches. Today’s campus doesn’t bear much of a resemblance to the 18th-century model (much of the original was destroyed in the Revolutionary War), but you can visit Hamilton Hall, a 1907 structure designed by McKim, Mead & White, with a statue of the famous student standing outside the front entrance.

In Alexander Hamilton,

===============================

Harlem

Hamilton Grange

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

414 W 141st St, New York, NY 10031

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“The neat, handsome structure had a yellow-and-ivory frame exterior, topped by classical balusters. With six rooms upstairs and eight fireplaces to warm the family in winter, it was clearly designed with Hamilton’s brood of seven children in mind. As elegantly meticulous as Hamilton himself, the house was small for a man of his fame, though marked with mementos of his past power. Visitors entering the doorway under a delicate fanlight glimpsed a Gilbert Stuart painting of George Washington, a gift from Washington himself. Ironically, the Anglophile Hamilton furnished the parlor with a Louis XVI sofa and chairs. The centerpiece of the house was two octagonal rooms that stood side by side, one serving as parlor, the other as dining room. When the doors were thrown open, they created a single, continuous space in which to entertain guests. The mirrored doors that covered three sides of the parlor reflected the leafy landscape seen through the high French windows. Further blending the living room with the sylvan setting, the windows opened onto a balcony with panoramic river views.”  Page i1,185

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

=================================

Upper East Side

Gracie Mansion

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

E 88th St & East End Ave, New York, NY 10028

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“A year later, trading in government bonds grew so brisk that the Buttonwood group adjourned to an upstairs room of the new Tontine Coffee House, a three-story brick structure at Wall and Water Streets, right near Hamilton’s New York home. Its first president was Archibald Gracie, whose East River mansion was to house New York mayors.”  Page i1100

===================================

Weehawken, New Jersey  

Weehawken Dueling Ground

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

773 Boulevard E, Weehawken, NJ 07086

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“At Weehawken, the Hudson Palisades form a steep cliff rising nearly two hundred feet from the water, and they were overgrown by thick woods and tangled brush. From afar, the cliff looked like a straight drop to the water, an impenetrable wall of rock clothed with dense vegetation. But at low tide, a little beach appeared down below. If the duelists pushed aside the bushes and tramped up a narrow path, they came upon a rocky ledge twenty feet above the Hudson that was well screened by trees. Idyllic and secluded, it faced an uninhabited stretch of Manhattan shoreline. Flanked by boulders and an old cedar tree, this level shelf was about twenty-two paces long and eleven paces wide—just large enough to accommodate a duel. The property was owned by Captain William Deas, who resided atop the cliff and was frustrated that his ledge was constantly used for duels. He heard the pistol reports, but could not see the duelists.”  Page 1978

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

================================

Philadelphia

National Constitution Center

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

525 Arch Street,  Philadelphia, PA 19106

In Alexander Hamilton:

 

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

=============================

Independence Hall

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

520 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103

In Alexander Hamilton:

 

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

VISITPHILLY: When delegates gathered at Independence Hall for the Constitutional Convention in 1787, Hamilton was the only one of New York’s three delegates who signed the U.S. Constitution. Discussions were contentious but Hamilton, who authored the Federalist Papers, ultimately helped convince other delegates to support the Constitution.
===============================

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

Second Bank of the United States

420 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106

In Alexander Hamilton:

 

VISITPHILLY Among the many legendary heroes whose portraits hang in the Second Bank of the United States, the portrait of Alexander Hamilton that Charles Willson Peale painted circa 1790-1795 is a standout. The Parthenon-like building has been transformed into a portrait gallery of prominent citizens of the 18th and 19th century.

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

==================================

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

Carpenter’s Hall

320 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106

In Alexander Hamilton:

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

VISITPHILLY:  In creating the Bank of the United States, Hamilton did what had never been done before: He created the first central bank not owned by a monarch. While construction of the First Bank building was underway, the newly created federal bank was housed in Carpenters’ Hall from 1794-1797.

 

===============================

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

First Bank of the United States

116 S 3rd St, Philadelphia, PA 19112

In Alexander Hamilton:

 

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

Built from 1795-1797 when Philadelphia was the U.S. capital, the First Bank was Hamilton’s solution to the problem of dealing with the nation’s enormous war debt. As Treasury Secretary, Hamilton also developed a standard currency to be used by all the states. Although the First Bank is not open for visitation, the classic architecture makes for stunning photos.

==============================

Museum of the American Revolution

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

101 S. Third Street Philadelphia, PA 19106

In Alexander Hamilton:

 

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

An expansive collection of art and artifacts from the nation’s Revolutionary Period The young Captain Alexander Hamilton was a rising star in George Washington’s army and a key player in the Revolution. At the new Museum of the American Revolution (which opens April 19, 2017), visitors can see Washington’s authentic Headquarters Tent, where the General, Hamilton and others plotted military strategies throughout the war.
101 S. Third Street Philadelphia, PA 19106

===================================

Alexander Hamilton’s Former Home

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

226 Walnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19106

In Alexander Hamilton:

 

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

Although the home where Hamilton, his wife Eliza and their children lived is gone, a plaque marks the location where they rented a house circa 1700-1795. When Eliza was out of town, it was here that Hamilton engaged in a scandalous, career-ending affair with the very married Maria Reynolds.
226 Walnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19106

===========================
Powel House

244 S. 3rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106

In Alexander Hamilton:

 

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

A luxurious mid-Georgian 18th-century mansion Living at 3rd and Walnut streets, Hamilton was a frequent visitor of the Powel House, home of Elizabeth and Samuel Powel, one of Philadelphia’s most prominent colonial-era power couples. Tours mention Hamilton’s letter to his wife Eliza, in which he asked her if she had been taking her medicine and suggested she think of the advice that Mrs. Powel once gave her regarding her health.

 

===================================

City Tavern

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

In Alexander Hamilton

“After signing, (the Constitution) the delegates adjourned to the City Tavern, which John Adams described as the “most genteel tavern in America,” for a farewell dinner. 103 Behind the conviviality lurked unspoken fears, and Washington, for one, doubted that the new federal government would survive twenty years.”   Page i

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

Washington D.C.

The Treasury

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

In Alexander Hamilton

“As Alexander Hamilton began to stitch together his grand plan for a vigorous central government, the executive branch was still tiny and embryonic. On his first day at Treasury, Hamilton likely wandered through a set of empty rooms; he soon installed an elegant mahogany desk with caryatids—female figures—carved into its spindly legs. He was to perform an amazing amount of work on that desktop. Hamilton employed no ghostwriters for his countless speeches, articles, and reports, and almost all of his letters have come down to posterity in his own hand.”  Page 839

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

=================================

The White House

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

In Alexander Hamilton:

“The north wing of the Capitol still lacked a roof, and Pennsylvania Avenue was studded with tree stumps. Quail and wild turkey abounded, and the sharp reports of hunters’ guns punctuated construction sounds. It was very much a southern town, with ten thousand white citizens, seven hundred free blacks, and three thousand slaves. As a result, the majority of the six hundred workers who erected the White House and the Capitol were slaves whose wages were garnisheed by their masters. The federal government was still so small that when it had moved from Philadelphia the previous year, the complete executive-branch archives fit neatly into eight packing cases.”  Page 1798

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

===============================

Washington Monument

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

In Alexander Hamilton:

“Eliza aided her friend Dolley Madison in raising money to construct the Washington Monument and remained sharp and alert until the end.” 25  Page i2057

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

Dead Ends

 

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

==============================

Merchants  Coffee House

In Alexander Hamilton:

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

================================

Park Theater

In Alexander Hamilton:

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

===============================

King’s College 

Main | What to See | Where to Stay | Where to Eat | Book Club Travel

West Broadway and Murray, Barclay and Church Streets

In Alexander Hamilton: 

“Set on an enormous tract of land that Trinity Church had received from Queen Anne early in the century, King’s College stood on the northern fringe of the city, housed in a stately three-story building with a cupola that commanded a superb view of the Hudson River across a low, rambling meadow. This elevated campus is defined by today’s West Broadway, Murray, Barclay, and Church Streets, a spot that one British visitor rhapsodized as the “most beautiful site for a college in the world.” Page i164

In Real Life:

In Alexander Hamilton,

 

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *